A glimmer of hope for the “little-man” and you

I always enjoy stories about the ”little-man” against the system and with this story from china where a guy and his family refused to leave his home hit the mainstream news I was instantly captured.

Even though the ”little-man” usually looses in the end these is something about these stories that make them more than just news. They capture our imagination about our own struggles in life and make us think bout how we would react. And even though we would properly give in, just like the “little-man” does in the end, it would give us the idea that for once we fought the systems and for a small glimmer in time we had the feeling that we were winning.

It is something to remember when the system is trying to keep you down.

Before (believing that winning is possible)

TOPSHOTS

After

654380-china-freeway-house

Democratic deficit and the uneaven playing field

This is the next chapter in my series on Social Risk, enjoy.

What do “doing business” and the degree of democracy have to do with each other?

Well for one there is no doubt that companies that operate in environments where there is none or very few institutions in place to ensure a stable business environment often find themselves in situations where ethic and morality is strained. Just take a look at Shell in Nigeria (Oil drilling), H&M in Bangladesh (Clothing factory) or Maersk in China (Container factory) and one will know what it means to operate in such an environment.

To some degree the democratic deficit is self-imposed or reproduced through the understanding that we are “all on the same boat together”. Businesses blame the business environment, Governments blame international society, NGOs blame international business and the population blame politicians. So what we need is stable democracies that are characterized by good governance e.g. institutional structures in which the individual´s rights and freedoms are respected are a prerequisite for sustainable development. This means improvements in two areas:

  • That Rule of Law is upheld, ensuring a level playing field.
  • Democratic structures in place that ensures that can ensure that power is distributed and not centralized to a few individuals.
  • Cooperation should be undertaken with NGOs and civil society forces that work to achieve openings for democracy. In other cases, such as where civil society is small or non-existing, the focus should be on communicating an awareness of democracy, human rights, gender equality and market economy

In Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where economics determines politics of the day and where a culture of democracy has been absent and if present is under the will of a few elites. Even the smallest democratic opportunities are economically conditioned especially during elections because of poverty, corruption, illiteracy, unemployment and not least a playing field which has been all but level.

As we have celebrated the Arab spring there is no evidence that these old structures are so easily dismantled. We hoped for free-elections and a greater degree of transparency would be present, but it has done little in terms of growing a culture of democratic thinking in the region. For example, the political move by Mohammed Morsi to centralize power around the president in Egypt or the lack of security and move towards radical Islamism in Tunisia. The lesson is that democracy is fragile and needs to be supported by strong institutions that can balance the pursuit for power by individuals with the principles of democracy.  

The Social Democratic concept of democracy views political institutions as a means to offset the natural power of concentrated wealth that accrues in capitalist economies. However, during the economic crisis it has become apparent that individual states can’t handle the burden that they have been put under alone and have to seek assistance from others. In Africa for example there is no strong institution that can rescue countries in need so there are basically left to their own devisees, while we in the western world can draw on intergovernmental institutions like the EBC or others. In essence this means that the developing world is left with institutions like the IMF, EU, EBRD and the World Bank that impose strict guidelines for economic behavior and limits the ability for democratic processes. This again leads to a greater gap between the ones that have and the ones that don’t both on a region by region level but also between individual states creating tensions and eventually conflict.

For companies a democratic deficit means an uncertain future business environment. It means increased risk of catastrophic collapse and it means that what you might think is yours today might not be so tomorrow because there is no state to guarantee tour basic rights.

Links

http://www.economist.com/node/21555927

http://www.africanexecutive.com/modules/magazine/articles.php?article=5441

http://www.princeton.edu/~amoravcs/library/framework.pdf

IMF – Why the spike in food/oil price is different from 2008

Wondering if history is repeating? IMF thinks that there are significant difference between the 2008 food/oil price spike and the one we are experiencing now in 2012. Main argument is that volatility is not the same as then and there is no uniform development across crops.

The analysis is sound in my mind. While I do not believe that the “IMF cure” is what we need with its focus on inflation as the only remedy. IMF acts like the surgeon who said “The operation was a success but the patient died”

However, one good point is that governments should reduce tax on food as a way to reduce the impact of a volatile food market.

Judge for your self:

http://www.imf.org/external/podcast/2012/Foodprices.mp3

China in for a soft landing

After years of two digit growth figures in China the economy is about to slow a bit down for what IMF believes will be a soft landing. The main drive for this change is the situation in Europe, which does not seem to improve anytime soon. However, the domestic Chinese market seems to be a driver.

Apple story – Understanding your consumption

The apple story seem to continue to fascinate people and professionals. Even though that Foxconn is not only producing products for Apple that have become the all-time favorite when it comes to poor ethics management and lack of efficient control systems.

It is quite interesting that people can disregard corporate behavior if the brand of a company is strong enough. Most of my own students use Apple products and they are never surprised when I talk about the ethics record of the company. However, this knowledge does not seem to change their willingness to buy their products. Maybe because there is a wide consensus that most of the production facilities making hardware products in China are more or less branded as being in violation of Labour and Human Rights it does not hit Apple as hard. So while we know that Apple is in violation of these Rights at least we know what they are doing and at least it gives us some idea about their actions.

I received this quite informative infographic from Tony Shin, which I think highlight the case quite good. I know that some of my friends that specialize in Chines working conditions would regards some of theses issues as being quite “normal” and not really seen as a big issue inside China. However, the infrographic from Tony does give a opportunity for customers to gain knowledge about how their consumer goods are produced.

iKill
Created by: Tony Shin